Tag Archives: Hildegard Günzel

Making my own ball jointed doll-The blueprint

Yippiee I am finally structured and have decided to make a sketch for my ball jointed doll

My aim is to make my own ball jointed doll. After experiencing some ups and downs during my doll making project that I started in November, I have now decided to start again and  post my new journey.

My aim is to make my own ball jointed doll. After experiencing some ups and downs during my doll making project that I started in November, I have now decided to start again and  post my new journey.

The ball jointed doll I am planning to make should be a teenager, that’s why I now made a  rough sketch of the doll.

The main idea behind the making of a blueprint, a sketch,was to determine the height of the doll and to get  the proportions right.

There are some essential rules when it comes to the human proportions. Artists measure the body in head lengths. The average european body would be 7,5 or 8 heads high. A 14-year-old would be about 7 heads high.

Haha my sketch is not that beautiful, I admit, but well, it was more an attempt to get the proportions right, rather than creating a perfect sketch =)

In order to be sure about the head lengths, I checked Hildegard Gunzel’s book “Creating Original Porcelain Dolls” . Here are some examples from Günzel’s doll book :

creating your own porcelain dollgunzel book creating original porcelain dolls

Well, this was my first step at making myown ball jointed doll. I made a blueprint of my future bjd and took the first (fresh )step of my doll making process. This time I will stay focussed!

Oh and by the way, just for those of you who wonder why I sometimes call the lady ‘Günzel’ and at times ‘Gunzel’: well originally  her name is  Günzel, as she is a german doll artists, but I sometimes write Gunzel, because that’s how she is referred to in the english speaking world.

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What helps me to get started as a bjd artist?

I started with the head of my doll and it takes a long time to get the proportions perfect. Although to my mind the head and face are the most difficult part to sculpt, i usually start with the head because it gives me an idea of the personality of my doll. I still have to look for some plastic eyes or for beads to use for the prototype. Later on i will cut them out and have formed eyes without the iris, because i am planning to cast my doll. But more to that later.

You might be interested in the books i am working with. Here is a very helpful guide for beginners and the advanced doll artist:

Künstlerpuppen selbermachen       Hildegard Günzel  Porzellankopfpuppen: modellieren, Formenbau, gießen, brennen, bemalen

This is a perfect book from Hildegard Günzel, a famous german doll artist. It contains a short introduction about the history of dolls, which is quite interesting. Then Günzel gives detailed information about ways to model a doll, how to make different molds and finally how to paint the dolls with china paintings. Every information is followed by beautiful pictures of Günzels’ dolls made in the 80s (because i purchased an old second-hand version).

I love this book. Even though i am not planning to cast in porcelain at the end, the information is quite useful, as i might cast my doll in papier-mache slip.

Another book that i am using is a book for basic sculpting.

It’s a german book by Philippe Chazot, but it’s also available in french .Chazot shares his secrets with the reader and gives good tips on how to sculpt easily.

Keep tuned if you want to see how my bjd turns out =)

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